Reconciling real-world visual functioning and clinically measured visual function indices

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Clinically measured visual functions in patients with ocular and neurological diseases may not be representative of real-world visual functioning in activities of daily living. Clinical instruments typically measure contrast detection, a fundamental visual ability from which more complex functions such as motion detection are derived. For outcomes of medical (e.g. bionic eye) and rehabilitative (e.g. vision training) strategies to be accurately translated to the real world, the relationship between clinical and practical visual functions must be understood. This project involves a “bench to bedside” approach where laboratory-based tests and analyses are conducted and applied to real-world patient situations.

IDEAL CANDIDATE

The ideal candidate should have a background in vision science or biomedical science. Clinical experience is desirable but not essential. The ideal candidate should have a breadth of academic, practical or clinical experience that would allow them to conduct a “bench to bedside” project. Strong communication skills are desirable due to the amount of human patient/subject interaction during the experimental phases, and because of the cross-disciplinary nature of the research topic, engaging with various stakeholders such as eye care practitioners (optometrists, orthoptists and ophthalmologists), rehabilitation experts (e.g. orientation and mobility specialists) and basic scientists. Additionally, experience in computer programming is desirable, but the relevant skills will also be taught during the candidature.
Supervisory team
Sieu
Khuu

Science
Optometry and Vision Science
Michael
Kalloniatis

Science
Optometry and Vision Science
Jack
Phu

Science
Optometry and Vision Science
jack.phu@unsw.edu.au