Phenotypic plasticity and aging in a changing world

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Human-induced changes such as clmate change threaten many populations. Evidence suggests that for many organisms, an increase in temperature expedites aging. Importantly, aging is often associated with the loss of phenotypic plasticity, key for population viability in a changing world. Surprisingly, we know very little about how plasticity changes as organisms age. This project will fill this knowledge gap on age-dependent plasticity using both theoretical and empirical approaches. Our project will reveal not only how phenotypic plasticity can dampen the effect of climate change, but also how, in turn, climate change itself can affect phenotypic plasticity.

IDEAL CANDIDATE

We are looking for a candidate with a background in ecology and evolution, so they are familiar with the theory and literature, although a candidate with a background in mathematics, statistics and computer sciences is also suitable. Ideally, a candidate should have some experience in empirical work (e.g. having conducted a field or lab experiment of their own) and good quantitative and computational skills (e.g. basic knowledge of linear algebra, competence in R). Also, we seek a demonstrated ability in academic communication in the form of journal publications and conference presentations.
Supervisory team
Shinichi
Nakagawa

Science
Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences
Tracey
Rogers

Science
Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences
Szymon
Drobniak

Science
Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences
s.nakagawa@unsw.edu.au