Neurophysical Responsibility, Mental Health and Youth Detention

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Recent advances in neuroscience and neurophysics suggest a need to rethink how mental (pre)dispositions impact judgement, behaviour and decision making. This project examines the positive and negative implications of neuro-determined legal accountability. The project will create a legal theoretical, neuro-scientific empirical and paediatric forensic observatory examining different types of neurological conditions, their impact on the physical and mental health of juvenile and young adult offenders, and the need for a more therapeutic focussed detention. This project will significantly contribute to an understanding of the neuro-physical capacity of juvenile offenders, advance criminal justice, and further knowledge of neurological determinism in general.

IDEAL CANDIDATE

The ideal candidate will hold a Masters or JD degree in law with at least a 2(1) standing or Distinction, and a Bachelor or Master Degree in philosophy and/ or neuroscience and/ or public health with an average equivalent to an Honours Class I, or a Distinction average at UNSW. In addition, the ideal candidate will have some experience as a paralegal or legal practitioner, worked with, for example, the Mental Health Act (Forensic Provisions) or Crimes Act (Dangerous Offenders), or an equivalent framework in other jurisdictions, and a demonstrated ability to conduct independent research leading to (peer-reviewed) publications.
Supervisory team
Marc
De Leeuw

Law
Law
Tony
Butler

Medicine
The Kirby Institute
Gary
Edmond

Law
Law
m.deleeuw@unsw.edu.au