Myopia management strategies and their impact on the anterior eye

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Myopia (short-sightedness) increases the risk of sight threatening diseases and is reaching epidemic levels in areas of Asia. To combat myopia’s progression in children, atropine eye drops or special contact lenses are increasingly prescribed alongside traditional spectacles. Unfortunately, these treatments are associated with changes to ocular structures when used chronically by older populations, resulting in treatment discontinuation. Millions of children are thus at risk of complications during myopia treatment. This project will assess functional and structural changes induced by these treatments by examining ocular surface cell types, morphology and inflammatory gene expression to inform long term impact of myopia treatment.

IDEAL CANDIDATE

The ideal candidate would possess knowledge of modern biomedical laboratory techniques such as cell cytology, immunohistochemistry, microscopy, PCR and/or flow cytometry. Experience with examination and sampling of the eye, ocular therapeutic management and the fitting of contact lenses is desirable but not essential. Eligibility of the candidate to be registered to practice optometry or ophthalmology in Australia would be an asset.
Supervisory team
Alex
Hui

Science
Optometry and Vision Science
Isabelle
Jalbert

Science
Optometry and Vision Science
Pauline
Kang

Science
Optometry and Vision Science
alex.hui@unsw.edu.au