Could economic inequality be slowing trends toward gender equity?

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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

As wealthy Western countries have progressed toward gender equity, differences between women and men in psychological traits, and conditions like anxiety and depression have, paradoxically, increased. One intriguing possibility is that rising income inequality among men and among women has changed incentive structures leading to wider gender gaps. Currently we know little about whether women and men respond differently to inequality.

This project includes experiments (conducted in person and online) and a cross-national study in order to understand individual differences in how people respond to inequality and changing global trends in behaviour.

IDEAL CANDIDATE

The candidate may have a background in psychology, behavioural ecology, anthropology, or economics. They will be committed to the empirical, theory-driven study of human behaviour.

Ideally they will have some experience in research design and statistical analysis. Programming experience and advanced computer science skills may be useful.

The phenomena we study are often ideologically polarising, and require an ability to write and speak with clarity and nuance. Evidence of excellent writing and communication skills, in academic and/or non-academic contexts, would be ideal.

We value diversity of background and experience in our team. The cross-national nature of some of our work means experience working in a variety of cultures will be an asset.
Supervisory team
Robert
Brooks

Science
Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences
Khandis
Blake

University of Melbourne
Psychology
Michael
Kasumovic

Science
Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences
rob.brooks@unsw.edu.au